Objectivity

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Project Armonia
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Objectivity

Post by Project Armonia » Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:12 am

http://forceacademy.co.uk/wiki/index.ph ... 26_Society

Being objective can be difficult. Especially when you are trying to get information from someone that is experiencing a crisis. I remember putting a good friend of mine through the roof during a training scenario in basic training where I was a rape victim. Mafla was getting very frustrated with me trailing off about how my “rapist” was like a fox, which led to “foxes are sly, evil creatures, beautiful and majestic, but sly. They like to trail off into the forests....” (wouldn't you know it, my husband's spirit animal is a fox! HA!). Anyways, eventually the scenario was halted, but by the time everything was said and done, Mafla had not gotten any information out of me.
As Jedi, we can't just give up on the problem. If we get a lot of information that is useless, we might still be able to find something that is useful. Going back to that scenario, it could very well have been that he was dressed in fox-like colors, or that the I, as the victim, knew my “rapist” and his nickname was “Fox”. A little far-fetched, but the point is that you don't toss all of it out, keep notes so that when something surfaces, if it appears to be something that “clicks” you can follow up on it and get more information. Then again, my mental state could have been just completely “out-there” from shock. So it's not something that necessarily needs to be looked at either. Just kept somewhere in the event you need to review the material because you hear something that might be pertinent to the case.

- Jedi Master Alethea Thompson

Assignment:

Do you find yourself often making missteps in judgment? How might you be able to improve your ability to think things through objectively?


Assignment 2:

This one requires a group of friends- that you strongly believe will be respectful of each other's beliefs, and will not lose their friendship over differences in opinion, and an interesting discussion. Pick a subject that deals with either ethics (birth control, capital punishment, etc) or politics (which president was the best president). Keep a running log of all the different points that each person has, and then consider what facts were actually presented, and what was merely opinion (you can just jot things down as they come up, or make mental notes of them). Consider how the opinions themselves helped shape your own understanding of the discussion. Was it because the person was passionate about the subject that their opinions sounded well found, or was it possibly something else? Then review the facts by themselves- did you reach the same conclusions your friends have? Sometimes you will, so don't be discouraged by that, but come back and report your findings. Tell us what you learned from the experience as a whole.

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Project Armonia
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Re: Objectivity

Post by Project Armonia » Tue Apr 08, 2014 7:35 am

Lesson 12

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